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Chichén Itzá

Chichén Itzá
Chichén Itzá

 

Chichén Itzá (El Castillo pyramid)(Tulum, Yucatan – 179 km. west of Cancún) — some time before Columbus’ arrival in the Americas, this site was once a thriving Mayan city, considered one of the largest in existence. The pyramid that marks this location exhibits a multitude of architectural styles, reminiscent of styles seen in central Mexico and of the Puuc and Chenes styles of the northern Maya lowlands. The presence of central Mexican styles was once thought to have been representative of direct migration or even conquest from central Mexico, but most contemporary interpretations view the presence of these non-Maya styles more as the result of cultural diffusion. Due to its prominence, at least 1 million tourists visit it annually.

Along with the main attraction (El Castillo pyramid, a.k.a. Pyramid of Kukulkán), there are: Juego de Pelota (Main Ball Court), the North Temple, Temple of Jaguars, Tzompantli (Temple of the Skulls), Platform of the Eagles, Platform of Venus, Sacred Cenote, Temple of the Warriors, Tomb of the High Priest, and other Mayan ruins.